Archive for the ‘LV-A Students’ Writing’ category

Seasons of Life

March 26, 2015
Literacy Volunteers-Androscoggin

Androscoggin between Auburn and Lewiston
Photo by Elizabeth Scott

Grey clouds above us, what do you hold in store for us? Will it be rain, sleet, or snow? Will we feel the cold wet mist that comes from the slightly icy river? We play near the river bank as we build our snowmen. Months go by and the snowmen begin to melt. Winter breaks for another season.

A new season awakes. The new start of life is waking up. As the last bit of snow melts and goes away, the tips of green grass begin to peep out from the ground. The trees slowly bud with their beauty which shows pure amazement as the birds and bees come our way. Some come from very faraway places.

As more time goes by, summer arrives. More people will enjoy the summer with a picnic. Maybe they will go fishing or cool off by going into the water for a dip. The summer events are very fun, even for the bugs that make one heck of a cloud above your heads, as we sweat. But that ok, because for fall will come and the bugs will be no more.

As fall takes its turn, we are at the end for the four seasons we see beauty in the trees from all the leases are changing to a variety of colors. Many different colors that come to be beings the colorful ground as the leases fall. As the cold chilly air comes and the nights get colder the moon smile at us a bit brighter as the cold put all the living things to sleep we end our four seasons with a new begin.

By Elizabeth Scott, inspired by her husband

Literacy Volunteers Androscoggin

Elizabeth Scott and her LV-A tutor Linda Connally

Elizabeth Scott, although she loved school, was rarely able to attend due to an abusive home-life, then a host of moves to various foster homes. When life became more stable and she was finally in a place where she could go to school regularly, she was enrolled in the fifth grade. School was no longer a joy as she struggled with so many gaps in her education. She graduated from high school with minimal reading skills.

Once she became a mom and her son entered the public school system, Elizabeth recognized that she needed to improve her reading skills in order to help her child succeed in school. She connected with a Literacy Volunteers tutor and has been working hard on her education ever since.

Today, Elizabeth is able to help her son with his school work, and she has become a published poet.

Hop Jump by Elizabeth Scott

May 1, 2014

Hop, jump, in and out of relationships wishing you will find your happiness.  I watch you from the side as you hop, jump, in and out only to see you hurt yourself.

Hop, jump. Today, you put on a smile and as you pretend that nothing is wrong, you’re only burning it deeper and deeper within yourself.

Hop, jump, here comes another one to fill your void. May it not be a violent one, as you show no care for yourself, or for your body.

You hop, jump to a different one. You always do the same. You put on a disguise and smile as if nothing is wrong. Today, I saw you cry for the very first time. As I asked you what is wrong, your response was, “I found out that I have AIDS.”

 

Literacy Volunteers Androscoggin

Elizabeth Scott and her LV-A tutor Linda Connally

Elizabeth Scott, although she loved school, was rarely able to attend due to an abusive home-life, then a host of moves to various foster homes. When life became more stable and she was finally in a place where she could go to school regularly, she was enrolled in the fifth grade. School was no longer a joy as she struggled with so many gaps in her education. She graduated from high school with minimal reading skills.

Once she became a mom and her son entered the public school system, Elizabeth recognized that she needed to improve her reading skills in order to help her child succeed in school. She connected with a Literacy Volunteers tutor and has been working hard on her education ever since.

Today, Elizabeth is able to help her son with his school work, and she has become a published poet.

More from author Elizabeth Scott

April 29, 2014

STUCK IN THE BOTTLE

Stuck in the bottle nice and tight.

Suffocation is a fight.

Overly protective is a might.

In the bottle is not so light

Over caring is not so bright.

Slice the behavior and make it right

UNWANTED

The day I was born, I was unwanted. I was born to two young people that had no heart to care for themselves or for the children they had. The best thing they loved was partying. They would create children and never want them. I was unwanted and I had to learn to be a parent to the other children that they created. I would feel bad for them because I knew they were also unwanted.

We were made from two young people. I had to learn fast to be a parent, not just for myself but, for my siblings. We were often left alone and no adults were ever around. When they were around, we wished that they were not there. So much happened that DHS removed us from our parents.

I always felt unwanted. Twenty nine years later, my birth mom found me. After some time of talking over the phone, we decided to meet. I was trying to have my mom back in the hopes of being wanted. So, I took a trip with my son. In four days, things went horribly wrong. On the fourth day, I heard the most crushing words from my mother’s mouth. She said, “I never wanted you. I wish that I never had you as my daughter.”

And still today, I feel unwanted.

WHAT BEING PUBLISHED MEANS TO MELiteracy Volunteers-Androscoggin

INSPIRED BY LINDA CONNELLY

Publishing my work is a great feeling of pride. As a child, I was called so many things that tore me down. I was told from parents and classmates that I was a retard and that I was a nobody. I believed them as time went by. My life was rough. I would dream of writing to help not just myself but to help others. I do believe that we should help one another rather than tear each other apart.

So, what does being published mean to me? It’s a great’s feeling to me!!! I am not stupid. I am not a retard.  I am a person with feelings. Yes!!!! I have made it!!!!

I am truly proud of myself for having the courage to write and follow my dreams of being a somebody.

BY ELIZABETH SCOTT

 

Literacy Volunteers Androscoggin

Elizabeth Scott and her LV-A tutor Linda Connally

Elizabeth Scott, although she loved school, was rarely able to attend due to an abusive home-life, then a host of moves to various foster homes. When life became more stable and she was finally in a place where she could go to school regularly, she was enrolled in the fifth grade. School was no longer a joy as she struggled with so many gaps in her education. She graduated from high school with minimal reading skills.

Once she became a mom and her son entered the public school system, Elizabeth recognized that she needed to improve her reading skills in order to help her child succeed in school. She connected with a Literacy Volunteers tutor and has been working hard on her education ever since.

Today, Elizabeth is able to help her son with his school work, and she has become a published poet.

The Day I Gave Birth to You

December 10, 2013

The day I gave birth to you was the most exciting thing that ever happened to me.  I had never felt so much pain and excitement in all my life. I had all kinds of different emotions. I first felt the inner joy of having you in my stomach. A bit of peace came over me.

As I gave birth to you, you came out not breathing. My emotions quickly changed to a shock of feelings of numbness and sadness as I cried. I heard the doctors say, “He is not breathing.” Then, “Now we got him breathing.”  I quickly changed that emotion to a feeling of excitement and feeling truly blessed.

The doctors checked you over and said “He’s a healthy baby.” I started to cry with the overwhelming emotions. The doctors asked if I wanted to hold you but, I couldn’t because the emotion of feeling that I would fail as a parent scared me to death. So much that I said, “No, I can’t, I can’t.”

As the doctors gave you to your father to hold, I cried feeling exposed. I watched you being held and all I could think of was what a beautiful baby you were. As your father held you, he looked at me and said, “If you don’t hold him now, you may never bond with him. I know you may be frightened you need him as much as he needs you.” So, he slowly placed you in my arms and smiled. I looked at you and I started to feel the emotions of strength and belief that I would be a great mother to you. To my baby, I love you with all that is within me.

By Elizabeth Scott

Literacy Volunteers Androscoggin

Elizabeth Scott and her LV-A tutor Linda Connally

Winter Means

December 9, 2013
LV-A Student Story

Photo by Sue Reilly

In the winter, I share the joy of playing in the snow with my kids. I hear them laugh as they run around going from making snow angels to making snowmen that can barely stand up straight.

 They run up the hill with their sleds and they are very fast coming back down. As I throw a snowball at them, they are quick to turn around. The snowball fight is lots of fun. They tease me by saying, “Don’t start something if you can’t finish mom.”  As we all begin to get very tired, we all start to wind down. We froze our buns off from the cold chilly air so we all headed back inside to warm up with a nice cup of hot cocoa.

I looked out the window to watch the beautiful snowflakes fall and I saw my husband working very hard. He was shoveling the cold, wet, heavy snow. As it got much colder outside, I saw him stop to blow his nose. I knew then to make an extra cup of hot cocoa.

By Elizabeth Scott

Literacy Volunteers Androscoggin

Elizabeth Scott and her LV-A tutor Linda Connally